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Candis Barks Recognized By VA With BEE Award

Pictured left to right are: Tina Thomas, acting associate medical center director, Barks, Miller, and Reilmann.

 

The John J. Pershing VA Medical Center (VAMC) in Poplar Bluff recently presented its “BEE Award” to Advanced Medical Support Assistant and Navy Veteran, Candis Barks.

 

The BEE Award stands for “Being Exceptional Every (Day)” and was adopted by the John J. Pershing VAMC  in 2021. It is designed to be the DAISY Award counterpart for nursing assistants and health technicians. Since its inception, the facility expanded the award to include other occupations.

 

The DAISY Award is for nurse practitioners, RNs and LPNs, said Associate Director for Patient Care Services Chandra Miller, and the BEE Award goes hand-in-hand with it.

“The DAISY cannot survive without the BEE, and the BEE cannot survive without a DAISY,” Miller said.

 

Barks, who has served in her role at the Farmington Community-Based Outpatient Clinic for 22 years, was nominated by a Veteran patient, who said she has “always treated me with respect and dignity” and she “keeps all of my information confidential, and she is committed to helping with my needs when I call, and she’s helped me to be sure I have everything I need.”

 

Barks was very surprised when she was presented the award, saying “I love all the Veterans, and I like my job taking care of them. I especially like to take care of the older Veterans. I know them and their families because I’ve been here so long.”

 

Farmington Nurse Manager Emily Reilmann describes Barks as “a team player, and she is one of the first ones to offer help. She is always there to help Veterans and goes above and beyond to do so.”

 

“Candis Barks is so impressive,” adds Miller. “She understands that she is one of the first interactions that our Veterans will have and takes that to heart each and every time, making each of their experiences unique to them.  Every time I visit the Farmington CBOC, she is always smiling and assisting a Veteran.”

 

To be nominated by a patient, Barks said, is the ultimate reward.

 

“It feels much better because I made an impact on that Veteran. I am heartfelt,” she said.

 

 

 

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